Carl Seguiban resides in British Columbia which inspires his haiku. His poems have been published in Mayfly, Modern Haiku, Frogpond, Bottle Rockets, A Hundred GourdsMoongarlic, Presence, Under the Basho, paper wasp, The Heron’s Nest, Cattails, Prune Juice among others.

 

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summer stars—
she asks which one’s
her mother

 

MDW says: This is a melancholy invocation of death, with the “she” seeming to be a young girl. The poem is immediate and provides clear seasonal and experiential imagery.

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a kite soars
the length of its string
—morphine drip

 

MDW says: The kite string is compared visually to the morphine tube—both of which can symbolize hope. I imagine someone undergoing treatment in a hospital seeing the kite outside the window, and feeling lifted in a similar way.

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passing clouds—
the shapes we leave
on a grass patch

 

MDW says: Mere shadows become symbols for the entire universe. We leave indents not only on the grass where we might have been lying down to watch the clouds, but we leave impressions on life itself by the “shadows” we cast as well.

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moonlight trickles
down her bosom’s wetness
summer solstice

 

MDW says: Does the balance of the solstice suggest a rightness to the mystery of the bosom’s wetness?

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paper boat
drifting with the tide
my numbered days

 

MDW says: The insignificance of a paper boat is equated to one’s own seemingly insignificant life. The poem seems to project futility, but somehow balances this thought with contentment.

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